Anacaona were called the “Queens of Havana” in the 1930’s when it was anathema for young ladies to be seen at nightclubs, let alone to perform there. And perform they did – breaking rules, stirring souls and forever changing the role of women in Cuban arts and culture.

Between the 1940s and 1960s, Concepción Castro Zaldarriaga and her seven sisters (augmented by several other members) toured across the Americas, the Caribbean and beyond, performing a variety of styles including son (the quintessential Afro-Cuban rhythm), charanga (a style of popular Cuban dance music) and Latin jazz. During this golden era, these incredibly talented women recorded three discs for the RCA Victor label and were featured in Mexican cinema.

When the Castro sisters retired in 1987, Georgin

Anacaona were called the “Queens of Havana” in the 1930’s when it was anathema for young ladies to be seen at nightclubs, let alone to perform there. And perform they did – breaking rules, stirring souls and forever changing the role of women in Cuban arts and culture.

Between the 1940s and 1960s, Concepción Castro Zaldarriaga and her seven sisters (augmented by several other members) toured across the Americas, the Caribbean and beyond, performing a variety of styles including son (the quintessential Afro-Cuban rhythm), charanga (a style of popular Cuban dance music) and Latin jazz. During this golden era, these incredibly talented women recorded three discs for the RCA Victor label and were featured in Mexican cinema.

When the Castro sisters retired in 1987, Georgina Aguirre González (who, with her sister Dora, had joined the orchestra four years earlier) assumed the leadership of Anacaona. Together with a new generation of female artists from some of Cuba’s top music academies, Georgina continued the work begun by the founders, consolidating a style that combines tradition with modernity, to preserve and enhance the history of the group known as “Las Mulatísimas del Sabor”.  Anacaona, with more than 85 years of uninterrupted work and 14-strong members, remains one of the premier exponents of Cuban popular music and is considered “The Insigne Women’s Orchestra of Cuba”.

a Aguirre González (who, with her sister Dora, had joined the orchestra four years earlier) assumed the leadership of Anacaona. Together with a new generation of female artists from some of Cuba’s top music academies, Georgina continued the work begun by the founders, consolidating a style that combines tradition with modernity, to preserve and enhance the history of the group known as “Las Mulatísimas del Sabor”.  Anacaona, with more than 85 years of uninterrupted work and 14-strong members, remains one of the premier exponents of Cuban popular music and is considered “The Insigne Women’s Orchestra of Cuba”.